Trail Course Practice Fundraiser

Make a contribution of $25 (or more) to Mustangs to the Rescue and receive access to Sky Hawk Ranch’s trail course and trails this evening from 4pm until sunset. The Trail Course will be set up for practice or you can go for a recreation ride around the ranch!

Cost is per horse.

($15 of the event fee to Sky Hawk Ranch; for use of the facility.)

For more information about Mustangs to the Rescue visit http://mustangstotherescue.org/

Donated Hay!

WaHOOO! Now this is the kind of call we like to get! Today we got a call from a Terrebonne resident with 2 and a half tons of quality hay on his flatbed ready to donate! And before we could even send this note, he had shown up with his precious cargo. Two tons of grass hay & a half ton of alfalfa – in the barn! Thank you TOM HILTY!!! Your generosity is noticed and appreciated.

Thank you tom Hilty!

 

Trail Course Practice Fundraiser

Make a contribution of $25 (or more) to Mustangs to the Rescue and receive access to Sky Hawk Ranch’s trail course and trails on Saturday evening from 4pm until sunset. The Trail Course will be set up for practice or you can go for a recreation ride around the ranch!

Cost is per horse.

$15 of the event fee goes to Sky Hawk Ranch; for use of the facility.

For more information about Mustangs to the Rescue visit http://mustangstotherescue.org/

CRR Residents Help Rescued Horses

By Kay Limbaugh, CRR Liaison to Mustangs to the Rescue

Crooked River Ranch residents have joined forces to support Mustangs to the Rescue (MTTR), a non-profit organization headquartered at Sky Hawk Ranch in Terrebonne. At a meeting June 30, eleven CRR residents, met with Kate Beardsley and Sandy Mayernik, two board members of MTTR. Since that meeting, Alice Stevens, Lotte Hermannsson, Rae Bordwell, Berta McBride and Kay Limbaugh have spent time at Mustangs to the Rescue cleaning the horses’ stalls, leading them to graze and giving them baths.

 

Mustangs to the Rescue’s mission is:

  • to provide positive options for horses in immediate need,
  • to help the local community by providing horse owners and potential horse owners with assistance, educational opportunities and resources to ensure safe and secure homes for our equine partners,
  • to assist local, state and federal agencies in managing horses and horse populations; wild or otherwise, and
  • to elevate the public’s view of horses, especially Mustangs, by placing them in roles of service such as Search and Rescue, Packing Services and Mounted Patrols.

 

CRR residents attending the meeting learned that MTTR offers a wide range of volunteer opportunities. Some require horse experience, but many do not. Ranging from working directly with the horses to general maintenance and specialized medical care to one-time assignments, volunteers fill out a crew application and attend an introductory orientation and training session prior to beginning their work. Volunteers who meet the requirements commit to a variety of schedules varying from a few hours per month to several days per week. MTTR also needs financial assistance which can be provided via PayPal to info@MustangstotheRescue.org or to their account at any US Bank.

 

Any CRR resident interested in volunteering with Mustangs to the Rescue can contact Sandy or Teri at info@MustangstotheRescue.org or contact CRR’s liaison to MTTR at LimbaughK@gmail.com. Together CRR residents and MTTR can positively impact the lives of rescued horses.

 

For more information about MTTR, visit their Facebook page at https://www.facebook.com/MustangstotheRescue or their website at http://MustangstotheRescue.org

 

Air Scenting Equines

By Richard Cockle / The Oregonian  Published: June 22. 2013 4:00AM PST

TERREBONNE — An Appaloosa gelding named Joker took 2 minutes and 20 seconds earlier this month to find a carefully hidden volunteer in a 13-acre, semi-wooded field near Terrebonne.

Jefferson County Sheriff Jim Adkins watched, astonished, as Joker and rider George Ehmer, 66, of Milton-Freewater, nosed out the hidden volunteer.

It was a dramatic and spectacular demonstration of what practioners call “equine air-scenting.” The event was organized by a loosely knit Central Oregon group that hopes to use horses in the role of bloodhounds during backcountry searches.

“They’ve definitely got my attention,” Adkins said. “That was a pretty difficult search because the wind kept changing on us. That horse just went right over there and zigged and zagged and zoomed right in.”

Horsewoman Kate Beardsley, of Redmond, arranged the search demonstration with Laurie Adams of Camp Sherman. They are assembling a team of a dozen air-scent trained horses and riders that they hope eventually will be deployed around the Northwest when hunters, hikers and others go missing.

“A lot of people don’t know that horses do this at all,” said Beardsley. “Laurie and I are focused on saving lives.”

The ranch-raised Beardsley, 47, said a horse’s olfactory receptors rival those of a tracking dog. As a horse trainer, professional horse packer and founder of a nonprofit horse rescue called Mustangs to the Rescue, Beardsley owns two horses schooled in air-scent techniques and has helped organize air-scent clinics here for six years.

While little-known, the concept has been around awhile.

“I call it the lost art,” says horse trainer Terry Nowacki of Argyle, Minn., who began reviving the techniques about 11 years ago. “It is the best-kept secret in the horse world.”

Theodore Roosevelt was aware of what horses’ noses can do, and hired a hunting guide in the 1880s that “followed his horse’s nose to buffalo,” according to Roosevelt biographer Edmund Morris.

Four decades earlier, a mustang called Sacramento repeatedly saved explorer Col. John Fremont’s life by scenting enemies along the trail, wrote frontier historian Glenn Vernam. Texas folklorist J. Frank Dobie also wrote of horses with exceptional noses in his 1952 book, “The Mustangs.”

Tracking dogs can outperform horses in thick underbrush, said Nowacki, 57. But horses often hold the advantage because airborne scent rises, and horses stand taller than dogs, he said.

Nowacki has written two books, the “Air Scenting Horse,” and, “Equine Language and Communication Journal.” Nowacki has a website, Equine Detection Services, and hosts four or five clinics a year on equine air-scenting around the nation, including one in Terrebonne in early June.

“This is so natural for a horse,” Beardsley said. “Horses smell everything, and they tell everyone around them what they smell.”